The Bluff Trail

The Bluff Trail near Halifax, NS


This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars
30 kms
14hours
difficult
Rock Climbing, Snowshoeing, Canoeing, Hiking, Cross Country Skiing
Winter, Fall, Summer
Halifax, NS
User smburt
"On behalf of all the wild things that make this land their home and with reverence for the First People who preserved this land before us, we dedicate the Bluff Wilderness Hiking Trail to wilderness preservation. We do this in trust that we can learn its deep beauty, in trust that we can understand and delight in the wildness in ourselves that we share with the rocks, earth, water, and teeming life and spirits that surround us, and in trust that we will work together to protect this sacred heritage."

The Bluff Trail was constructed by the Woodens River Watershed Environmental Organization under a letter of authority from the Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources.

The trail, entirely on Crown Land, begins inside the Woodens River watershed and climbs onto the high ground between the Woodens River watershed and the Nine Mile River watershed to the east.

The trail is in the form of four stacked loops that eventually go around Upper Five Bridge Lake and join with canoe access at Paradise Cove. There in only one trailhead, located on the Beechville-Lakeside-Timberlea (BLT) trail at a point midway between the Hwy 103 overpass just south of Exit 4 and the northern tip of Cranberry Lake. Three canoe-accessible trailheads will be constructed at the south ends of Cranberry Lake, Frederick Lake, and Hubley Big Lake. The first two loops of the trail (the Pot Lake Loop and the Indian Hill Loop) were constructed in 2003 by six students employed for two months plus help from some twenty volunteers, all coordinated by Peter Romkey. Together, the first two loops are about 12 km and take a full seven hours to hike.

The second two loops (called the Bluff Loop and the Hay Marsh Loop) were constructed in 2004. The four loop system covers over 30 km.

The signs at the trailhead emphasize that this trail is for experienced hikers; they warn hikers of some of the potential dangers of wilderness hiking.

The trail runs through ecologically sensitive barrens. It is for hiking only. It is critical that hikers stay on the trail, given the sensitivity of the area. The trail has been carefully routed to avoid wet areas and especially vulnerable places. We have made the trail narrow without using human-made structures. We intend that no ATVs or bikes use the trail. Hikers are expected to pack out what they carry in and practice techniques of wilderness travel that leave no trace.

For reasons of safety, hikers should carry a map and compass, first aid kit, adequate water and water purifiers, extra layers of warm, dry clothing, rain jacket and rain pants, a knife, emergency matches, and flashlight. Hikers should be alert since they will be traveling through bear and moose country. The trail is a wilderness trail, designed to challenge and delight the experienced hiker. Hikers should use caution at all times.

The trail passes through many different kinds of flora, including stretches of hardwoods, such as birch, oak, and beech, as well as large black spruce stands, mixed forests, fens, and many open granite barrens. The lichens covering the granite rocks are old and the uncommon Mountain Sandwort plant can be found here.

The trail moves generally along high ground, affording frequent stunningly beautiful vistas of the surrounding wilderness and lakes. At one point it runs through a stand of large old growth red pine between Pot and Cranberry Lakes. When completed, the trail will travel over the Bluff plateau, which is one of the highest points near Halifax, and wander through a large stand of jack pine, uncommon in these numbers in Nova Scotia.

The purpose of the trail is to allow the Woodens River community and the public generally to become aware of these extraordinary natural assets, on the principle that awareness is the first step in protection.

Much of this land is barrens and unsuitable for harvesting wood and difficult to develop into residences. As a result it has been left wild. It is wild not only in the sense of being undeveloped but in the sense of not being directly controlled by human needs and interests. Hunters visit the areas in hunting season, but for the most part these areas have remained undisturbed by frequent human travel. The bush in these areas is often extremely dense. Hiking in these areas is difficult without trails.

When people go there, they are immediately impressed with its wildness. The experience is forbidding and alienating for some. For others it creates feelings of awe and even reverence and puts them in touch with parts of their natures that go untouched in the normal course of civilized affairs.

For them, walking in the solitude of ancient rocks and fens will bring wonder and joy. They may feel afraid to let others know about it, afraid it will be destroyed and that they will have betrayed the wild lives that own this place. They may be afraid too that if they don't, the consequences will be the same.

We believe that once people have experienced this wildness, most will understand its importance to their lives and the lives of their children and will not let it be destroyed.

Note that this region also facilitates canoeing and bouldering activities.

(write up courtasy of Wooden River Watershed Environmental Organization. Used with their permission.)

their website

Directions:

To access the parking lot you go to exit 4 on hwy 103, turn onto the Bay Road (Rt.3) heading back to Halifax, go 2 km to Bay Self-Storage on the right. The Bluff Trail parking lot is immediately afterward. No trailers are allowed in the parking lot nor is overnight parking permitted.





Please check the bottom of the Description (above left; click) for the author's written directions.

Post a Review

Please  Sign-In  or  Register for free in order to post reviews


Instructions:


(a) Click Wiki Edit This Page to get placed in edit mode

(b) When finished, your update is available to view as draft

     (click wiki update pending in trail to see draft)


* note: editors are notified and must approve the change
Download Gps
By backcountryrentalsPosted By: backcountryrentals  - Mon Jan 13 23:07:19 UTC 2014 Not Rated
By lshicksPosted By: lshicks  - Sun Mar 21 16:27:09 UTC 2010 This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars Upside Challenging, scenic, has areas to camp as well as canoe or kayak, good chance of seeing wildlife. Downside If you don't leave early or bring a tent, you'll miss out on the later loops. We heard coyotes as we rounded the 2nd loop so, when they say to take care of wildlife, they mean it. We also saw what looked to be Lynx fur on some of the rocks near the outer side of the second loop. Comment We left in the late afternoon, so we only took the first two loops. It took us a little over 5 hours to do the first two loops and, had we taken camping gear, I would've loved to finish the entire thing. The first loop is quite foresty and I really enjoyed the fact that the trail was uneven and challenging. The second loop is much more barren, covered in rock and - we found - less strenuous than the first loop.

Honestly, this is the best trail I've hiked on mainland Nova Scotia so far, with a variety of terrain that keeps backtrackers interested. There are many beautiful views and I would recommend hiking this in early spring or fall before the first snow as it can get quite muddy in some areas!
By jpaulberryPosted By: jpaulberry  - Tue Mar 04 18:30:58 UTC 2008 Not Rated Comment The Woodens River Watershed Environmental Organization (WRWEO) is holding its Annual General Meeting on March 25, 2008

Location: Upper Tantallon Public Library, Hubley Mall, Exit 5 Highway 103
Date and Time: Tuesday March 25, 2008 from 6:45 PM to 8:45 PM

Keynote speaker: Raymond Plourde, Ecology Action Centre, discussing the Wilderness Areas Protection Act


If you are interested in or concerned about:

- hiking, canoeing, hunting and/or fishing in and around the Woodens River Watershed

- the environment including water quality, development, logging, and human impact on our natural areas;

Then you should come to WRWEO's Annual General Meeting and become a member or run for election to the Board of Directors. Membership costs $10.

The Woodens River watershed occupies 16,000 acres (more than 25 square miles) of the Chebucto Peninsula about 20km to the west of Halifax, Nova Scotia

Visit our website for more information: www.wrweo.ca

By smburtPosted By: smburt  - Sun Sep 02 20:05:10 UTC 2007 This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars Upside Finally got the chance to do this trail on the last weekend of my summer's holiday. What a treat, yet only doing the first of four loops, what a tease! Beautiful views, and a great way to profile such a distinct location. Beautiful views, great rock erratics strewn all over the place.

I noticed the signs at the beginning saying that it was for experienced hikers only, and wondered if the motivation was more litigous than realistic until I set foot on the narrow route. Definately a technical route with its roots, rocks and mud.
Downside Not enough time to take it all in this time. Comment What a great trail, and so close to the city. If youi don't like to hike it, canoe it!
By smburtPosted By: smburt  - Sat Feb 10 11:48:17 UTC 2007 Not Rated Comment Editor's note: One of the chairmembers of the trail committee wanted this passed along:

The Woodens River Watershed Environmental Organization (WRWEO) is holding
its Annual General Meeting on March 21, 2007

Location: William Black United Church Hall 10507 Peggys Cove Road (Hwy
333), Glen Margaret (13.5 Kms from the intersection of Saint Margaret's Bay
Road and Peggys Cove Road/Hwy 333 in Upper Tantallon)

Date and Time: Wednesday March 21, 2007 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Keynote speaker: Councilor Gary Meade - will provide a brief history of the
Woodens River


If you are interested in or concerned about:

· hunting and fishing in and around the Woodens River Watershed

· the environment including water quality, development, logging, and human
impact on our natural areas;

· hiking and canoeing;

Then you should come to WRWEO's Annual General Meeting and become a member
or run for election to the Board of Directors.

The Woodens River watershed occupies 16,000 acres (more than 25 square
miles) of the Chebucto Peninsula about 20km to the west of Halifax, Nova
Scotia
By jpaulberryPosted By: jpaulberry  - Wed Jan 03 12:41:41 UTC 2007 This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars This trail was given a rating of 5 out of 5 stars Upside Gorgeous scenery - a real wilderness trail that has canoe access. Downside None that I can see. Comment Its about 4 k from my doorstep! (Note there are 2 entries for the Bluff Trail on this site - this one and one via this link: http://www.trailpeak.com/index.jsp?cat=river-canoe&con=trail&val=1529


Copyright © 2001 - 2018 trailpeak.com